• Pitt CS Students Ritwik Gupta and Laurence Putterman Win Red Bull's Hack the Hits!

    Pitt Computer Science students Laurence Putterman and Ritwik Gupta, along with Tiffany Jiang from Carnegie Mellon, were recently one of 5 teams around the nation picked to compete in Red Bull’s Hack the Hits hackathon in San Francisco this past weekend. Their team won first place where they created a MIDI controller that mimics the experience of playing a string instrument with some additions. Over the course of 24 hours, each of the 5 teams (from schools such as Stanford and UC Berkeley) tried to create an expressive, playable instrument that could be used in a live or studio setting. Using four touch sensitive “thinpot” (thin potentiometer) sensors connected to an Arduino and some cardboard, they recreated the general shape of a guitar, where the thinpot sensors took the place of strings. This enabled the player to expressively slide their notes just like a string instrument player. In addition, a Leap Motion attached to the body of the instrument allowed players to modulate effects by gesturing in front of the instrument with their hands. The thinpot sensors send their output to the Arduino, which relays the information over a serial connection. Max for Live, a powerful visual programming environment specifically designed for interfacing with Ableton Live (audio software), receives this data, separates the data according to sensor, and transforms those values into MIDI. Each sensor outputs to its own MIDI channel, allowing the user a great deal of flexibility with regards to how they would like the instrument to sound. They were featured in Forbes, follow the link for the article http://goo.gl/RR5G8M Congratulations to Ritwik and Laurence!!!

    Pitt Computer Science students Laurence Putterman and Ritwik Gupta, along with Tiffany Jiang from Carnegie Mellon, were recently one of 5 teams around the nation picked to compete in Red Bull’s Hack the Hits hackathon in San Francisco this past weekend. Their team won first place where they created a MIDI controller that mimics the experience of playing a string instrument with some additions. Over the course of 24 hours, each of the 5 teams (from schools such as Stanford and UC Berkeley) tried to create an expressive, playable instrument that could be used in a live or studio setting. Using four touch sensitive “thinpot” (thin potentiometer) sensors connected to an Arduino and some cardboard, they recreated the general shape of a guitar, where the thinpot sensors took the place of strings. This enabled the player to expressively slide their notes just like a string instrument player. In addition, a Leap Motion attached to the body of the instrument allowed players to modulate effects by gesturing in front of the instrument with their hands. The thinpot sensors send their output to the Arduino, which relays the information over a serial connection. Max for Live, a powerful visual programming environment specifically designed for interfacing with Ableton Live (audio software), receives this data, separates the data according to sensor, and transforms those values into MIDI. Each sensor outputs to its own MIDI channel, allowing the user a great deal of flexibility with regards to how they would like the instrument to sound. They were featured in Forbes, follow the link for the article http://goo.gl/RR5G8M Congratulations to Ritwik and Laurence!!!

  • Pitt Computer Science Supports NCWIT Aspirations in Computing by offering scholarships to NCWIT Winners!

    The National Center for Women & Information Technology (NCWIT) is a non-profit change leader network of more than 650 universities, companies, non-profits, and government organizations nationwide working to increase women’s meaningful participation in computing. The Department of Computer Science is a proud NCWIT Academic Alliance Member. The NCWIT Award for Aspirations in Computing honors young women at the high-school level for their computing-related achievements and interests. Awardees are selected for their computing and IT aptitude, leadership ability, academic history, and plans for post-secondary education. Offers both a national and local award competition. The Department of Computer Science offers a $5,000 scholarship for NCWIT Aspirations in Computing Winners! The award ceremony was held on April, 2nd, 2016!

    The National Center for Women & Information Technology (NCWIT) is a non-profit change leader network of more than 650 universities, companies, non-profits, and government organizations nationwide working to increase women’s meaningful participation in computing. The Department of Computer Science is a proud NCWIT Academic Alliance Member.
    The NCWIT Award for Aspirations in Computing honors young women at the high-school level for their computing-related achievements and interests. Awardees are selected for their computing and IT aptitude, leadership ability, academic history, and plans for post-secondary education. Offers both a national and local award competition.
    The Department of Computer Science offers a $5,000 scholarship for NCWIT Aspirations in Computing Winners! The award ceremony was held on April, 2nd, 2016!

  • Red Bull Hack the Hits Selects Pitt CS Students Ritwik Gupta and Laurence Putterman to Compete!!

    Pitt Computer Science students Ritwik Gupta and Laurence Putterman are part of one of only 7 teams chosen around the nation to compete in Red Bull's musical hackathon called Hack the Hits this weekend in San Francisco, California! Learn more about the hackathon and their team at http://redbullhackthehits.com! They are really excited to represent Pitt CS at the hackathon!! Wish them Luck!

    Pitt Computer Science students Ritwik Gupta and Laurence Putterman are part of one of only 7 teams chosen around the nation to compete in Red Bull's musical hackathon called Hack the Hits this weekend in San Francisco, California! Learn more about the hackathon and their team at http://redbullhackthehits.com! They are really excited to represent Pitt CS at the hackathon!! Wish them Luck!

  • Mohamed Aly, CS Ph.D. Alumni, featured in Forbes Magazine

    Mohamed Aly, under the advising of Panos Chrysanthis and Kirk Pruhs, received his Ph.D. in 2009. In 2011, he founded his own start-up called Seeloz. Read the full Forbes article here

    Mohamed Aly, under the advising of Panos Chrysanthis and Kirk Pruhs, received his Ph.D. in 2009. In 2011, he founded his own start-up called Seeloz.
    Read the full Forbes article here